Interventiondeprenyl
Alternate Nameselegiline
OrganismCanis lupus familiaris
Aging PhenotypeLife-span extension
Allele TypeN/A
StrainBeagle
DescriptionAdministration of 1 mg/kg per day L-deprenyl to Beagle dogs for 2 years and 10 weeks signigicantly increased survival of dogs between 10 and 15 years old at the start of the study (Ruehl et al., 1997). Twelve of 15 (80%) dogs in the L-deprenyl group survived to the conclusion of the study, in contrast to only 7 of 18 (39%) of the dogs who received placebo (P=0.017). At the time the first L-deprenyl treated dog died on day 427, 5 placebo treated dogs had already succumbed, the first on day 295.
Similar treatments have been found to increase life-span in mice, rats, and hamsters. However, it should also be noted there are a number of reports of failure of (-)deprenyl treatment to extend life-span and shortening of lifespan by (-)deprenyl treatment has also been reported (reviewed in Kitani et al., 2002).
Gene FunctionMAO B (monoamine oxidase) inhibitor (Knoll, 1980)
Other Phenotypes
Homologs
Primary ReferenceRuehl, W. W., Entriken, T. L., Muggenburg, B. A., Bruyette, D. S., Griffith, W. C., and Hahn, F. F. (1997). Treatment with L-deprenyl prolongs life in elderly dogs. Life Sci 61, 1037-44. [Abstract]
Other ReferencesKitani, K., Minami, C., Isobe, K., Maehara, K., Kanai, S., Ivy, G. O., and Carrillo, M. C. (2002). Why (-)deprenyl prolongs survivals of experimental animals: Increase of anti-oxidant enzymes in brain and other body tissues as well as mobilization of vari [Abstract]
Relevant Links
Keywordsdeprenyl, selegiline, selegeline, dog, SOD, superoxide dismutase, CAT, catalase, oxidative stress, oxidative damage, radicals, cancer, tumor, spleen, immune, humoral